Colorado Real Estate Commission receives meth lab complaints

The Colorado Real Estate Commission has received complaints from buyers that they were shown contaminated meth lab homes by Colorado realtors. One of those complaints came from a pregnant buyer who said that a realtor showed her a home that had not been decontaminated. The Commission says that it is investigating the allegations and is working on educating real estate brokers about meth labs.

According to Colorado law, once a property owner has received official notification that their property has been used as a meth lab, they have two choices. They can decontaminate the home according to the standards set by the State Board of Health OR they can have the property demolished. If they elect to have the property torn down, Colorado law mandates that the property owner fence off the area to make it inaccessible to the public. Until the property has been decontaminated or condemned, the owner can not allow anyone to enter the property.

Colorado’s meth lab statute requires that realtors and brokers take precautions before taking a potential buyer to view a property. If a seller or a landlord tells them that their property was previously used as a meth lab or other illegal drug lab and it has not been decontaminated, they can not enter the property, nor can they show it to interested buyers of renter. The statute also denies access to real estate appraisers.

The Colorado Real Estate Commission hopes to educate brokers about the statute to prevent any further complaints. They warn that future incidences of non-compliance with the statue may result in disciplinary action.

2 Responses to “Colorado Real Estate Commission receives meth lab complaints”

  1. babs brookes Reply

    Is there any way to check meth contamination in the immediate neighborhood around a home that I am considering purchasing in Boulder? And, of course, the home itself?

    If the broker says it is meth free, is this enough?

    Babs

  2. Hi Babs,
    You could call the police department and health department that manage the area where the homes are located and ask them if they have anything on record about the home that you’re interested in buying. Keep in mind that only about 1 in 10 homes where meth has been manufactured have ever been busted, so there may be no public records about the homes in the neighborhood or the home you’re interested in buying. The only SURE way to find out if a home is contaminated with meth lab chemicals is to have it tested.

    You can also take a look at a list of meth lab homes in Colorado and the list of meth lab locations listed on the DEA’s meth lab registry. If you don’t find the addresses that you’re looking for, it does not mean that the home or homes have never been used to make meth though.

    Real estate brokers are only required to disclose any “known” hazards in a home. If the real estate broker tells you the home is meth free, ask for a copy of the testing report! If they tell you the home is meth free, then they should evidence to prove it, which would be a testing report done by someone qualified to test for meth lab chemicals.

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